The Purring Pulsar

I like sciency-wiency stuff. And cats. And other things.

rudygodinez:

Maria  Clara Eimmart, Ten Depictions of Heavenly Phenomena, (late 17th century)

 Immart was the daughter of the history painter, portraitist and amateur astronomer Georg Christoph Eimmart, with whom she collaborated. Her father was director of the Malerakademie in Nürnberg but also established a private observatory. She was given a broad education in the fine arts, and specialized in botanical and astronomical illustrations. She made a series of some 350 drawings of lunar phases, observed by telescope, and captured on distinctive blue paper. Twelve of these were given to conte Marsili, a scientific collaborator with her father, of those twelve, ten survive in Bologna. She shortly thereafter married her father’s pupil and successor, the astronomer Johann Heinrich Müller and died in childbirth.

(via kebechet)

finchmandala:

biohazardsakura:

im-fucking-delightful:

imnotreallysanta:

secret-soup:

noirandhotchocolate:

ladyshinga:

hohohoenn:

iconic video of my childhood

I still regularly quote this.

I can’t reblog this without providing a link in case anyone doesn’t know what this is.  Because everyone should know what this is, I feel.

I too still quote this, dear lord

my mom and i quoted this the other day when she asked me to get her laptop.
me “BUT I’M LE TIRED.”
Mom “Well…. have a nap….. THEN GO GET MY LAPTOP.”

I quote this on an almost daily basis as well.

Fucking kangaroos.

DUBYA TEE EFF, MAYTE

MY CHILDHOOD.

(Source: minasmorghoul, via redderz)

astrotastic:

awkwardsituationist:

the first gif shows one full year of full moons between may 2005 and april 2006. its size at perigee (when nearest to us) and apogee (farthest from us) differs by more than 10%. the wobble, due to the moon’s elliptical orbit and slight axial tilt and inclination, is know as  lunar libration. (not to be confused with lunar libation, which is fancy speak for moonshine.) the second gif shows the moon’s phase and libration during october of 2007.

Wibble wobble

Wibbly wobbly moony woony!

(via lookatthesefuckinstars)

ancientart:

The Nebra sky disk, found near Nebra, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany. It is dated to c. 1600 BCE, and is associated with the Bronze Age Unetice culture.
This artifact weighs 2.2 kg, and is inlaid with gold symbols. It is thought that this disk was an astronomical instrument, and likely also held religious significance. This find reconfirms the abilities and astronomical knowledge of the people of the European Bronze Age, which included the sun’s angle between its rising and setting points at summer and winter solstice, and close observation of the sun’s course over the year. The Nebra sky disk is the oldest known “portable instrument” showing such measurements.
The disk appears to have been developed in four stages (Meller 2004):
1) On the right is the waxing moon, on the left the full moon, and between and above, the Pleiades.

2) Arcs are added on the horizon for the zones of the setting and rising of the sun. Individual stars were shifted and/or covered.

3) The “sun boat” is added.

4) The disk in its current condition. A star and part of the full moon (or sun) was restored.

(The diagrams used are by Rainer Zenz)
Euan MacKie suggests that the Nebra disk can be linked to Alexander Thom’s reconstructed solar calendar from his analysis of standing stone alignments in Britain.
Courtesy & currently located at the State Museum of Prehistory in Halle, Germany. Photo taken by Anagoria.

ancientart:

The Nebra sky disk, found near Nebra, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany. It is dated to c. 1600 BCE, and is associated with the Bronze Age Unetice culture.

This artifact weighs 2.2 kg, and is inlaid with gold symbols. It is thought that this disk was an astronomical instrument, and likely also held religious significance. This find reconfirms the abilities and astronomical knowledge of the people of the European Bronze Age, which included the sun’s angle between its rising and setting points at summer and winter solstice, and close observation of the sun’s course over the year. The Nebra sky disk is the oldest known “portable instrument” showing such measurements.

The disk appears to have been developed in four stages (Meller 2004):

1) On the right is the waxing moon, on the left the full moon, and between and above, the Pleiades.

2) Arcs are added on the horizon for the zones of the setting and rising of the sun. Individual stars were shifted and/or covered.

3) The “sun boat” is added.

4) The disk in its current condition. A star and part of the full moon (or sun) was restored.

(The diagrams used are by Rainer Zenz)

Euan MacKie suggests that the Nebra disk can be linked to Alexander Thom’s reconstructed solar calendar from his analysis of standing stone alignments in Britain.

Courtesy & currently located at the State Museum of Prehistory in Halle, Germany. Photo taken by Anagoria.